That explains it

How dumbasses get their suits.

Business majors spend less time preparing for class than do students in any other broad field… business majors had the weakest gains during the first two years of college… business majors had the weakest gains during the first two years of college…. Business programs also attract more than their share of students who approach college in purely instrumental terms, as a plausible path to a job, not out of curiosity… Students don’t compose a complete paper of their own…. “We’ve got students who don’t read, and grow up not reading…”

Interesting.

5 thoughts on “That explains it

  1. Gringo

    Back in the day I took an interdisciplinary course which one week involved playing a Real Estate Game with business majors. Within 20 minutes of starting the game the business majors thought I was an Accounting major. I had never taken an Accounting course in my life. I simply applied logic to numbers.

    That experience did not leave me with a high respect for undergraduate business majors.

  2. Corey

    Amazing. America has perfected a comprehensive tool-promotion system. This may be even more efficient than hereditary aristocracy.

  3. Marcus Anonymous

    I really like the subtitle: “How dumbasses get their suits.”

    As the Wizard of Oz told the scarecrow, “I can’t give you a brain, but I can give you a diploma.”

    On the other hand, what about all those liberal arts majors who think that they are impressive scholars and think that we should try harder to get more people to graduate from college. (President Obama thinks that it is a worthwhile goal.) They think that more college diplomas will improve the person and the country. So we push more kids through college that don’t belong there. That is the real lesson that one should take from the Chronicle of Higher Education article.

      1. Marcus Anonymous

        Actually, I’ve taught college. The best students are hyper-motivated people who comeback at age 30 and eat up the material. I’ve asked them why someone like them didn’t make it through the first time and they tell me that the first time around, “They had a lot of fun.”

        They had to grow up first. The problem is, that by the time many people get the motivation and maturity, they’ve grown up responsibilities — especially families. It’s too late to make that commitment.

        This is particularly true with boys who get their physical, intellectual, and emotional maturity later than girls.

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